Should These Apps Go Radiant Orchid?

Radiant Orchid, Color of the Year 2014.

Our designers experiment with Pantone’s 2014 Color of The Year. Check out Vine, Evernote, Dropbox and Tumblr recolored. Radiant Orchid color sample by Pantone, PQ-18-3224TCX

On Monday, the Pantone Color Institute announced its 2014 Color of the Year. Pulling from global, economic and social indicators, Pantone carefully selects the hue that it thinks will set trends for the year across fashion, industrial design – and also app design. This year, Pantone chose Radiant Orchid, a pinkish purple shade that edges on mauve.

Violet is rich with symbolism. For a bit of color theory from Color Matters, purple can symbolize magic, mystery, spirituality, the sub-conscious, creativity, dignity, royalty. Lighter purples like this one are light-hearted, floral, and romantic.

Color-watchers will note that Emerald, Pantone’s pick for Color of the Year in 2013, made appearances in a number of mobile app designs this year. A prime example: check out the distinctive green used by Vine. And here at Sourcebits, we recently launched the chart-topping Cricbuzz app update in a lovely emerald shade.

Color samples from Pantone's previously announced colors of the year. Source: http://www.oneupweb.com/blog/pantone-announces-2014s-color-of-the-year-radiant-orchid/

With the influence of Pantone’s annual color in mind, we decided to explore the app design possibilities in the coming year. Will existing apps get a Radiant Orchid overhaul, or will we see shades of purple featured more in new products? Will products in violet shades focus more on women, or court mainstream appeal? What if Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter made the leap from blue to purple? Will Apple release an iPhone 5c in magenta?

Explore the Radiant Orchid updates we put together below, and let us know what you think. Which app would you like to see in Pantone’s “it” shade of 2014?

Now these are quick and simple hue swaps our designers did for fun, not a full redesign to integrate a color palette change. When we’re building and updating apps at Sourcebits, we always pay careful attention to the use of color. It can dramatically impact not just the look (obviously) of an app, but also the feel – and therefore your user experience.

iPhone Orchid

iPhone colored with Radiant Orchid.

Vine

Vine 1 Vine comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's radiant orchid colored version.

Dropbox

Dropbox comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's Radiant Orchid colored version.

Evernote

Evernote comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's Radiant Orchid colored version. Evernote comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's Radiant Orchid colored version.

Tumblr

Tumblr comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's radiant orchid colored version. Tumblr 2 Tumblr comparison between default colors and Sourcebit's radiant orchid colored version.

Interested in color-related tips for mobile app design? Tomorrow one of our design leads will share his best practices and how to keep app colors from looking dated.